L’viv, Ukraine (27th and 28th of January 2006)

Friday 27th of January 2006
I arrived around 7.00am in Lviv. I said goodbye to the two Ukrainian girls who had offering me oranges and chocolate for breakfast. They also put away my bed sheets etc. I walked to the ticket counter to arrange a train ticket for tomorrow night to Krakow (Craacow) but she said the only train going on the 28th was a 7.00am train for 200 hy).

Lviv – Krakow: from http://www.travel.inlviv.info/howtolviv.php
07.14 – 14.55 Duration: 8:41
13.56 – 20.45 (change in Przemysl Gl.) Duration: 7:49
08.30 – 13.44 Duration: 6:14

I thought it over but it would be better for me to take a night option. I would check the buses later. I went outside and had been advised on the Internet to take the number 66 maxi taxi bus.

It was just 1 hy for the bus ride and had read that my hostel would also be on this route. On the hostel website, they said get off after 15-20 minutes at the Khymychna stop but all bus stops are cyrillic so I missed it and went as far the end of the 66 bus route. I stayed on and came back. Once I saw spires etc, guessing that must be the old part of the city (town centre), I got off and explored the old town for about 3 hours. I tried the Tourist office but it was closed. from what I saw I liked. There was a lot of ice on the streets but it was been cleared away.

Lviv was once described as an undiscovered pearl of Europe. It has a very long history reflected in its architecture and way of life. Unlike many other cities of Ukraine, Lviv survived almost unscathed in WW2 and was spared by the Soviet government that left and preserved numerous architectural landmarks in the city.A visitor to Lviv could appreciate it as an old truly European city and at the same time could find so many reminders of the Soviet era. Everything east of Lviv, for thousands and thousands of miles all the way to the Pacific Ocean, is what so many westerners call Russia. West is Europe. So Lviv is a turning point – the last bastion of Europe before a vast expanse of the East.

I had printed out a map of the town from the hostel website showing where it was in relation to the town and opera house. Once I found the Opera building, I knew i was on the Main street, and I just had to walk along the Chornovola ave. till the crossroad with Khymychna street (15 min.). I knew when i reached there, the bus does pass it. Its where the Jewish Monument and garden is. From then on they are signs.

Youth Hostel ‘Afena’ is located in the center of Lviv, some 15 min. walk from the Opera and the Main street (Svobody Ave.) Youth Hostel ‘Afena’ is open all year-around. English-speaking reception is open daily from 9 am till 6 pm. Tourist information in English and Polish available. 24 hour check-in.

Once I went in, its an ordinary building block. Theres a bar inside beside the lobby and the hostel is on the 2nd floor but there was no one there. I went to the building attendant and he rang somebody. 20 minutes later a lady turned up. Its open all year but alot of flustering. Seems they dont get many guests. I paid 13 Euro for a single bed in a 4 bed dorm (normal beds). There was a TV but no wires or plug but nice external showers and a sink. I was tired but headed off a few minutes later. No lockers, no maps, no advice. You would not know it waa hostel, until they say it was. They gave me a key for the room. No other guests.





L’viv (Lviv), Ukraine

Taken on the 27th of January 2006

Armenian Church from 1363 – 1370 and the church courtyard with surrounding buildings create a unique corner of Eastern architecture in Lviv. Armenians settled in Lviv from the 14th century coming mostly from their old capital city Ani. Armenian Church in Lviv combines Armenian exterior laid out as a cross-shaped Ukrainian church in its floor plan view. The interior contains frescos from the 13th – 15th centuries as well as more recent examples. The south courtyard is an old Armenian cemetery. On the wall of the building adjacent to the cemetery is a wood-carved chapel from 18th century. Eastern courtyard has a column of St. Christopher in honor to the the head of the Armenian Court who funded restoration of this Armenian Church in 1723.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size





L’viv (Lviv), Ukraine

Taken on the 27th of January 2006

Armenian Church from 1363 – 1370 and the church courtyard with surrounding buildings create a unique corner of Eastern architecture in Lviv. Armenians settled in Lviv from the 14th century coming mostly from their old capital city Ani. Armenian Church in Lviv combines Armenian exterior laid out as a cross-shaped Ukrainian church in its floor plan view. The interior contains frescos from the 13th – 15th centuries as well as more recent examples. The south courtyard is an old Armenian cemetery. On the wall of the building adjacent to the cemetery is a wood-carved chapel from 18th century. Eastern courtyard has a column of St. Christopher in honor to the the head of the Armenian Court who funded restoration of this Armenian Church in 1723.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size





L’viv (Lviv), Ukraine

Taken on the 27th of January 2006

Armenian Church from 1363 – 1370 and the church courtyard with surrounding buildings create a unique corner of Eastern architecture in Lviv. Armenians settled in Lviv from the 14th century coming mostly from their old capital city Ani. Armenian Church in Lviv combines Armenian exterior laid out as a cross-shaped Ukrainian church in its floor plan view. The interior contains frescos from the 13th – 15th centuries as well as more recent examples. The south courtyard is an old Armenian cemetery. On the wall of the building adjacent to the cemetery is a wood-carved chapel from 18th century. Eastern courtyard has a column of St. Christopher in honor to the the head of the Armenian Court who funded restoration of this Armenian Church in 1723.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size





L’viv (Lviv), Ukraine

Taken on the 27th of January 2006

The Church of the Assumption complex was constructed in the period between 1572 and 1629. The ensemble includes the bell tower with the largest bell in Lviv called Kyrylo. The tower was funded by Korniakt and was given his name. While the tower was built parishioners constructed the Chapel of Three Saints next to it. The chapel is richly decorated with stone carved interior and exterior. The Assumption Church repeats the shape of the smaller chapel with three typical Ukrainian domes. Large square blocks of stone were used for the church walls. Among founders of the church construction were Ukrainian community of Lviv, rulers of Moldova and Russian Tzars and the Ukrainian Cossack hetman Petro Sahaydachny.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size





L’viv (Lviv), Ukraine

Taken on the 27th of January 2006

The Church of the Assumption complex was constructed in the period between 1572 and 1629. The ensemble includes the bell tower with the largest bell in Lviv called Kyrylo. The tower was funded by Korniakt and was given his name. While the tower was built parishioners constructed the Chapel of Three Saints next to it. The chapel is richly decorated with stone carved interior and exterior. The Assumption Church repeats the shape of the smaller chapel with three typical Ukrainian domes. Large square blocks of stone were used for the church walls. Among founders of the church construction were Ukrainian community of Lviv, rulers of Moldova and Russian Tzars and the Ukrainian Cossack hetman Petro Sahaydachny.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size





L’viv (Lviv), Ukraine

Taken on the 27th of January 2006

The Church of the Assumption complex was constructed in the period between 1572 and 1629. The ensemble includes the bell tower with the largest bell in Lviv called Kyrylo. The tower was funded by Korniakt and was given his name. While the tower was built parishioners constructed the Chapel of Three Saints next to it. The chapel is richly decorated with stone carved interior and exterior. The Assumption Church repeats the shape of the smaller chapel with three typical Ukrainian domes. Large square blocks of stone were used for the church walls. Among founders of the church construction were Ukrainian community of Lviv, rulers of Moldova and Russian Tzars and the Ukrainian Cossack hetman Petro Sahaydachny.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size





L’viv (Lviv), Ukraine

Taken on the 27th of January 2006

Sculpture on the side of a building on the Blessed Virgin, Mary.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size





L’viv (Lviv), Ukraine

Taken on the 27th of January 2006

The Church of the Assumption complex was constructed in the period between 1572 and 1629. The ensemble includes the bell tower with the largest bell in Lviv called Kyrylo. The tower was funded by Korniakt and was given his name. While the tower was built parishioners constructed the Chapel of Three Saints next to it. The chapel is richly decorated with stone carved interior and exterior. The Assumption Church repeats the shape of the smaller chapel with three typical Ukrainian domes. Large square blocks of stone were used for the church walls. Among founders of the church construction were Ukrainian community of Lviv, rulers of Moldova and Russian Tzars and the Ukrainian Cossack hetman Petro Sahaydachny.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size





L’viv (Lviv), Ukraine

Taken on the 27th of January 2006

Sculpture on the main street of Lviv called Prospekt Svobody (Freedom Avenue) near the Opera House.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size





L’viv (Lviv), Ukraine

Taken on the 27th of January 2006

Sculpture on the main street of Lviv called Prospekt Svobody (Freedom Avenue) near the Opera House.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size





L’viv (Lviv), Ukraine

Taken on the 27th of January 2006

Lviv Opera House (1895-1900). Construction was funded by the city government and from public donations. The Opera House was built on solid concrete foundation on top of the river which was diverted and enclosed in a stone tunnel. Statues on top represent: Glory in the middle, Genius of Drama and Comedy on the left and Genius of Music on the right. Statues of Comedy (left) and Tragedy (right) decorate the facade. Eight Muses stand over the main cornice. The interior is rich in marble, gilding, frescoes and sculptures. The ceiling in the lobby has 12 allegorical paintings associated with four seasons. The Hall or Mirrors can be reached from the 2nd floor of the lobby. The real jewel of the theater is the stage curtain Parnassus which is unrolled on first nights only.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size





L’viv (Lviv), Ukraine

Taken on the 27th of January 2006

Lviv Opera House (1895-1900). Construction was funded by the city government and from public donations. The Opera House was built on solid concrete foundation on top of the river which was diverted and enclosed in a stone tunnel. Statues on top represent: Glory in the middle, Genius of Drama and Comedy on the left and Genius of Music on the right. Statues of Comedy (left) and Tragedy (right) decorate the facade. Eight Muses stand over the main cornice. The interior is rich in marble, gilding, frescoes and sculptures. The ceiling in the lobby has 12 allegorical paintings associated with four seasons. The Hall or Mirrors can be reached from the 2nd floor of the lobby. The real jewel of the theater is the stage curtain Parnassus which is unrolled on first nights only.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size





L’viv (Lviv), Ukraine

Taken on the 27th of January 2006

Lviv Opera House (1895-1900). Construction was funded by the city government and from public donations. The Opera House was built on solid concrete foundation on top of the river which was diverted and enclosed in a stone tunnel. Statues on top represent: Glory in the middle, Genius of Drama and Comedy on the left and Genius of Music on the right. Statues of Comedy (left) and Tragedy (right) decorate the facade. Eight Muses stand over the main cornice. The interior is rich in marble, gilding, frescoes and sculptures. The ceiling in the lobby has 12 allegorical paintings associated with four seasons. The Hall or Mirrors can be reached from the 2nd floor of the lobby. The real jewel of the theater is the stage curtain Parnassus which is unrolled on first nights only.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size





L’viv (Lviv), Ukraine

Taken on the 27th of January 2006

Lviv Opera House (1895-1900). Construction was funded by the city government and from public donations. The Opera House was built on solid concrete foundation on top of the river which was diverted and enclosed in a stone tunnel. Statues on top represent: Glory in the middle, Genius of Drama and Comedy on the left and Genius of Music on the right. Statues of Comedy (left) and Tragedy (right) decorate the facade. Eight Muses stand over the main cornice. The interior is rich in marble, gilding, frescoes and sculptures. The ceiling in the lobby has 12 allegorical paintings associated with four seasons. The Hall or Mirrors can be reached from the 2nd floor of the lobby. The real jewel of the theater is the stage curtain Parnassus which is unrolled on first nights only.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size

I walked back into town. The Lets go guidebook said the number 5 tram will take you to the bus station. I got on and paid my 1 hy. I went to both depots to the both ends of town aand no bloody station. I had wasted a lot of time looking for the Number 5 in the first place. Bloody guidebooks. I walked back into town and luckily the tourist office was now open. There was a german guy inside who was very helpful. He told me how to get to the bus station and I purchased a map for 2hy. Their website has good information.

I then took the 71 bus ( other buses will suffice including the 7, 7A, 37, 81 and 35). It took about 15-20 minutes to get to the station but its the last stop so thats cool. It was easy but a ticket to Krakow for tomorrow night. It cost 98 hy.

Lviv – Krakow: Taken from here. You can also check out times and book online at the Ukraine Bus Comapny. They spell Krakow – Krakiv online.

12.00 – 21.10
19.50 – 05.00 (on even days)
22.00 – 07.10

I found the cyrillic language in Ukraine difficult to translate especially menus as no english Translations existed. I had a couple of beers (I think I can order a beer in 102 different languages) but meal time was different. I was forced into a restaurant in a amrket place that served chicken only. I only had to get two points accross: (1) whether I wanted a full, half or quater chicken and (2) which part of the chicken i wanted (leg, breat, thight). I ordred a half chicken with bread, sauces and a drink for 20 hy. I went back to the hostela round 8.00pm for a shave and a shower and went abck into town. I didnt go out out, I should ahve as the women here are pretty damn beautiful but I had an early enough night. I actually slept like a log. Maybe I didnt sleep so good on the train last night.

I found some of the information on the main attractions on this site. If you need for information, try some of these pages.