Monday the 31th of March 2003- Day 41.

Monday the 31th of March 2003- Day 41.

Hotel woke me at 7.00am. Had a shower and a haircut – self inflicted and took a taxi to the airport at 7.30am. Cost 6 P. Checked in and had a cofee. Seated next to a guy from Hollywood, County Down. Beautiful scenery all the way in. Flight took 40 minutes. Arrived into down. No buses travel into town so you must take a taxi. Lonely planet recommend Torre del Sur hostel. Booked in but found it overcrowded, crampted, untidy and smelly. Seven beds to a room, all facing each other, so someones feet would be at my head. No bunk beds. Decided to check out Cruz del Sur hostel which is recommended on the Lonely Planet Thorn tree. 18 p per night. Details are here. More relaxed here, tidy and friendly. Decided to change. The other hostel which charges 15 P per night were fine about it.











Patagonia – Flight to Ushuaia

Taken on the 31st of March 2003

Click on the picture to see it in its original size











Patagonia – Flight to Ushuaia

Taken on the 31st of March 2003

Click on the picture to see it in its original size











Patagonia – Flight to Ushuaia

Taken on the 31st of March 2003

Click on the picture to see it in its original size











Patagonia – Flight to Ushuaia

Taken on the 31st of March 2003

Click on the picture to see it in its original size

I found the following artticle in the Buenos Aires Herald, which can be found here.- They took it from a New York Times article which was only a few days old, so this March 2003 aricle is pretty much up to date.

Fear for end at end of the world

By TONY SMITH

USHUAIA — Here at the bottom of the world, life has always been a struggle.

In 1882, fears that underpopulation might tempt neighbouring Chile to contest Argentine sovereignty of Tierra del Fuego prompted President Julio Argentino Roca to order a penal colony founded here.

Prisoners worked on chain gangs, building roads, a railroad and power and telegraph lines. A steamship from the capital docked once a month.

When the jail closed in the early 1940s, military rulers of the time decreed Ushuaia should become the base for a fur industry and imported 50 beavers from Canada, freeing them in Tierra del Fuego’s pristine forests.

But the plan backfired, producing a beaver debacle. With no natural predators, the beavers flourished and the original 50 are now 120,000. In felling trees for dams, they have devastated huge stretches of woodland.

But the Argentine government has not abandoned attempts to make life viable in this remote region 3,000 kilometres south of Buenos Aires. Early in March, the sight of Richard Maiyo of Kenya loping down Ushuaia’s pretty harbour front just north of Cape Horn was the latest embodiment of their efforts. The 26-year-old Kenyan broke the tape to win the first Marathon at the End of the World, and local officials were euphoric.

The marathon “should definitely put us on the map as the destination at the end of the world,” said Viviana Manfredotti, the provincial official in charge of sports.

The city’s 45,000 inhabitants, struggling to survive Argentina’s economic crisis, can only hope that she is right.

First populated by Yamana Indians who passed on their indigenous name for this “bay that penetrates westward” to English sailors and missionaries arriving in Patagonia in the mid-1800s, Ushuaia has long searched for a niche.

About 20 percent of the population is now unemployed or underemployed. Aside from levies on local oil, people here depend on the 120,000 people who visit during the brief summer — December to March. The fall marathon and a sled-dog race and cross-country ski competition in winter extend the season.

A sharp devaluation of the peso last year made Argentina suddenly much cheaper for foreigners, and foreign destinations are too expensive for Argentines. So a new ski resort just outside Ushuaia is attracting Argentines and Chileans and helping to fill the city’s 3,000 hotel beds.

But the remnants of failed schemes to make this region viable are all around.

Daniel Scham, for example, is one of just 15 beaver hunters who still roam the woods, bagging beavers whose pelts fetch a mere five dollars each, compared to 45 in the 1980s. Even with the extra two dollars the government pays for each tail — supposedly an incentive to keep the beaver population under control — Scham and the other hunters must hold down a second job to survive.

“We can’t get a decent price because we are small-scale, but we can’t grow because there are only four or five furriers in the region,” he said.

In the 1970s, prosperity came, fleetingly, in the guise of a duty-free zone where multinationals assembled television sets and other electrical goods for sale in Argentina’s closed economy. State subsidies meant companies could pay wages four times higher than in the rest of the country and Argentines from all over flocked to Ushuaia, raising the population from a sleepy 15,000 to a bustling 60,000 in 20 years.

But when the economy opened up to world trade in the early 1990s, the duty-free zone closed and people started to leave.

“They wanted us to make furs, but today we all wear polyester,” said Pipi Morel, a former insurance clerk who now works as a tourist guide. “Then we made electric goods, but our car radios are now made in China. People stay here only because it is so beautiful and rugged and they love it.”

Even with tourism, Ushuaia’s remoteness is a problem. The marathon attracted only 160 athletes — not the expected 1,000 — but organizers stressed that was 33 more than the first New York City Marathon in 1970.

“At the end of the day, our remoteness is positive,” said Héctor J. Zubieta, who owns Ushuaia’s Las Hayas resort and says the city needs no more than one or two new hotels. “We need to grow, but not too much,” he said. “If too many people were to come here, it would be the end of the end of the world.”











Patagonia – Ushuaia

Taken on the 31st of March 2003

Ushuaia is the southernmost city in the world. It is located on the southern coast of Tierra del Fuego in Argentina, in a spectacular setting surrounded by mountains and overlooking the Beagle Channel. The city has about 50,000 inhabitants.

The city was originally named by early British colonists after the name that the native Yamana people had for the area. For most of the first half of the 20th century the city was centered around a prison for serious criminals. The Argentinean government set up this prison following the example of the British in Australia: being an island, escape from a prison on Tierra del Fuego would have been impossible. The prisoners thus became forced colonists and spent much of their time cutting wood in the lands around the prison and building the town.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size











Patagonia – Ushuaia

Taken on the 31st of March 2003

Also of interest is the Tierra del Fuego national park to see the Bahia Lapataia on to the west on the border with Chile, and hiring a boat charter to Cape Horn (in Chilean waters). Some other tourist places are the birds, penguin and seawolves islands in the Beagle Channel. Some tours also makes some visits to the World’s end Lighthouse, the one that was made famous by Jules Verne in the novel of the same name.

It is also a key access point to the southern regions; it receives regular flights from Buenos Aires, (at Ushuaia International Airport), and cruise ships visiting the Falkland Islands and Antarctica dock at the port. There are a number of ski areas nearby.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size

Sunday the 30th of March 2003- Day 40

Sunday the 30th of March 2003- Day 40

I was awoken at 5.30am to catch the bus to Rio Gallegos bus which was part of the package. Promised I would not wake the English Girls, but I wasnt packed and even thought the staff were meant to wake me 30 minutes before departure, they decided to wake me 10 minutes before, so it was rush, rush. I slept in my clothes which was one good thing. It was cold and dark as we pushed off. No sign of Leah or Jay but must have spent the rest of the night drinking. Had no interest in finding them and waking them. It was a nice but very cold drive to Rio…. most of the way. The drive shaft broke or was about to. We were stopped for an hour while trying to fit it. No luck. We had to wait until a van from Rio came (luckily we were half way there). Got a cheapie hotel from the Lonely Planet and had an early night after visiting the supermarket and cutting my hair.


Click on the picture to see it in it´s original size

Rio Gallegos – Argentina – Waiting for my plane (30-03-2003)

Saturday the 29th of March 2003- Day 39.

Saturday the 29th of March 2003- Day 39.

The ice treak goes from the hostel to Camp D Agostinti (2 hour 15) – Laguna Torre (3.00 h) to the Glacier Grande. 35km over all. My usual walk or capacity to walk would be between 15-20km per day. Therefore it was a hard day. Three people from the hostel were doing the trek – myself, Justin – A Malaysian and Kevin – an Asian American. We were met by Paula at 7.00am and we started straight away for Camp D Agostinti. It was still dark and very cold with front on the ground and trees(maybe -5 oc). We got to the camp at 9.15am where we met Ricardo. We had coffee, got gloves, a harness and cramptons for ice walking. We got to the river ar 10.15. We had to cross the river by rope pulleys.











Patagonia – El Chatlen

Taken on the 29th of March 2003

An early morning hike down to Rio Fitzroy and follow the river to glacier-fed Laguna Torre at 656 m (2,164 feet) at the base of Cerro Torre, one of the most difficult mountains in the world to climb because of its overhanging mushroom icecap.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size

The next part was the hard part of the walk. It took about 2 hours to reach the glacier as the walk was sreep with little paths to navigate. We had to climb vertical with our hands and feet, we had to skirt around mountain ledges with only one foot keeping us safe or a fall to our deaths hundreds of feet below. Some bits were scary, on this ledges and skirting over waterfalls. The two guides had their hands full, but the pace was still fast. We had to keep moving in order to be back before dark. At least you can drink the water from the rivers and waterfalls directly. Beautiful water. We reached the glacier and had to put on our cramptons. These are the spikes you put on to walk on ice. 2 spikes sticking out front and two on back. Eight below. We also had to put on sun block, glasses, gloves because there is little ozone here, and you can easily get burnt even in the cold.

As you can see, it was amazing, but we didnt have much time. We knew we had to leave at 3.30pm to get back before dark. We had a good time looking ar the ice rivers, caves and had two chances to ice climb. Basically, you climb with the aid of two ice axes and the spikes on the front of your cramptons.











Patagonia – El Chatlen

Taken on the 29th of March 2003

Patagonia – ‘ El Chatlen´ We were lucky as the summit was clear some; the Cerro Torre spire is truly dramatic, featuring a 1500 m (4,950 ft) high vertical wall, looming high above Glaciar Torre.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size











Patagonia – El Chatlen

Taken on the 29th of March 2003

Patagonia – ‘ El Chatlen´ This wasa hard day as we were more adventurous and choose to extend our day to and on Torre Glacier. The approach to the glacier involves an river crossing by rope and pully, and then a strenuous, very steep walk up the valley’s lateral moraine and a steep descent onto the glacier itself.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size











Patagonia – El Chatlen

Taken on the 29th of March 2003

Here we donned our crampons (provided) and scrambled over the contorted and broken surface of the glacier. While we breaked for lunch, our guide riged up a rope with which we tested our ice climbing skills (harness and ice axes provided).

Click on the picture to see it in its original size











Patagonia – El Chatlen

Taken on the 29th of March 2003

Here we donned our crampons (provided) and scrambled over the contorted and broken surface of the glacier.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size

Time to head home then…. Even though it was downhill in some parts, it was harder than going up, as we had to be so careful. One slip….. We were exhausted going back and it was hard to concentrate. We arrived back at 7.30pm, with a fast pace. 35km…..

As soon as we got in, we collapsed and ordered 3 bottles of beer. We stayed there exahusted until 1.00am. We drank with Leah and Jay (Dr Greene from ER lookalike) from Canada and Hilary and Nickie from my room. Jay and Leah were getting the early 6.30am bus the next day like me, but he was drinking for Canada. Had to go to bed. Sore all over. I also fell once on the ice and had some bruising to my leg and elbow.

Friday the 28th of March 2003- Day 38.

Friday the 28th of March 2003- Day 38.

Trip to El Chalten takes 4 hours (more like five because of the road). Nealy 220lm to get there, but again bleak Patagonain Steppe. Between El Chalten and El Calafate there is one (1) “refreshment” stop, and since there is not much traffic, it is all the more important to have sufficient gas and the where-withal to handle problems that might arise.

You can see the snow capped mountains which is nice. Again just one house (hotel) to see on the waya nd stop and have a coffee. You can see the two mountains- Mount Fitz Roy and Mount Torre. Chalten is a small tourist town established in 1985 with about 120 pernament residents. One road in and out. Still there are shops, bars and lots of agencies offering tours. I had booked wirh Chaalten Travel at the bus station in Calafate to book 2 nights accommodation, transport to and from and an ice trek for 225P. This was better than booking the pieces individually which would have come close to 300P. You can book a tour day tour with De Glaciers hostel in Calafate for 315 for the same thing (and you have to camp out). They offer anothers day walking, but you can do this yourself as they are waymarked walks.

You do not need a guide for this. If you get a bus separatly it is 40P each way. The hostel Rio Grande is 22P and the ice trek is 125P. As soon as you get to town, you stop at the National park Office so that the staff can tell you about the park, the rules and regulations. You don not have to play to get into the park as you are staying there, They give you a free (English or Spanish) map of the area telling you what walks you can do and details of the free campsites. yes, free campsites are available but are not serviced. They just have a loo. The guides detailed animals to be seen including Pumas. The main points were that there were no rubbish bins, so everything had to be brought back ( even cigarette buts). No toilets, so bury excrement, dont go the toliet near rivers as the water here is deinkable from the rives, and dont use toilet paper as its takes two years to degrade here. The mean average temperature is 7.5 oc. Its cold, rainy and windy here all year.

We were lucky today as the weather was fine, and no wind or rain. We had clean views of the mountains which was unusual,. Fitz Roy is 3405m high and Cerro Torre is 3102m hight making them the highest summits in South America. Only very skilled technical climbers go to the top.

As soon as I arrived at 1.00pm, I booked to the hostel at 1.00pm and left for a hike at 1.15pm. The hostel is clean, and quiet. No party animals here. People are here to trek, camp, and relax. The rooms (4 per room) are shared dorms. No local for the first night and two English girls the second night. No locks, lockers availble so you hope that people are honest. The hostel is Albergue Rancho Grande (54-2902-492212) or email rancho@cotecal.com.ar

I took a trek to Lago de les Tres (4 hours up, 3 hours down). Nice day, nice trek with some great views. Busy with people coming and going. Walking back into town with Kate from London, was was on a RTW.











El Chatlen

Taken on the 28th of March 2003

Click on the picture to see it in its original size

25th of March (day 35) to March 27th (Day 37)

Tuesday the 25th of March 2003- Day 35.
Spent my second night in Puerto Madryn. After seeing Penguins yesterday and knowing I will be seeing more down south, decided not to stay an extra day and go to go to Punta Tombs where approx. 200,000 penguins are located. This is the second biggest colony outside Antartica. You can actually walk around them (as in the middle of) as they don’t mind humans. Anyway because I am not a penguin nut, I decided to miss them. Therefore last night after returning home from the tour, I booked a bus ticket to Rio Gallegos, which is down south. Another 18 hour bus journey, friends. The bus is to leave at 3.34pm and arrive at 7.10am tomorrow morning. Taking the journey with TAM and the cost is 61 P. Anyway last night, the town was dead as usual at 10.00pm, had a quick meal – Lomito solo sandwich, chips and beer for 10P. Nice place. Did nothing today except surf the net, eat and walk around town. Had lunch at Mittos (de Mayo/ Julio). Had the same as last night excluding the beer but including a big mug of black coffee and water for 13P.

The bus was meant to leave at 15.45 but was late and did not go until 16.45. It was a TAC bus, not great at all – cramped, smelly and I was put beside a mother and two small kids. I could feel a nightmare journey coming up. Thankfully she left at the next stop 20 minutes on. After that during 18 hours of bus time, and only 1 stop later we arrived in Rio Galleges. Nothing bus bleakness on the trip. No trees, no animals, no mountains. Pure flat land with yellow, blueish grass. In fairness I have heard some of the farms here are 50,000 – 60,000 hectares big. Therefore, you will not see houses etc. There were no cars on the highway, just buses or trucks. We got our dinner and breakfast on the bus because there was no where to stop.

The general character of the Argentine portion of Patagonia is for the most part a region of vast steppe-like plains, rising in a succession of abrupt terraces about 100 meters (330 feet) at a time, and covered with an enormous bed of shingle almost bare of vegetation. In the hollows of the plains are ponds or lakes of brackish and fresh water. Towards the Andes the shingle gives place to porphyry, granite, and basalt lavas, animal life becomes more abundant and vegetation more luxuriant, acquiring the characteristics of the flora of the western coast, and consisting principally of southern beech and conifers.

Lots of information on Patagonia can be found here.











Patagonia ‘ Its bleak down south´

Taken on the 25th of March 2003

Río Gallegos is a city in Argentina and is the capital of Santa Cruz Province. It has a population of 80,000 and is 20 metres above sea level. It is 2,636 km from Buenos Aires. It was discovered in 1575 by the expedicionist Jofré De Loaiza, and was called San Idelfonso river before 1535, when Simón de Alcazaba finally named it Río Gallegos. Capital of Santa Cruz Province since May 19, 1904.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size











Patagonia ‘ Its bleak down south´

Taken on the 25th of March 2003

Río Gallegos is a city in Argentina and is the capital of Santa Cruz Province. It has a population of 80,000 and is 20 metres above sea level. It is 2,636 km from Buenos Aires. It was discovered in 1575 by the expedicionist Jofré De Loaiza, and was called San Idelfonso river before 1535, when Simón de Alcazaba finally named it Río Gallegos. Capital of Santa Cruz Province since May 19, 1904.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size


As you can see from the map the town is on the coast with access to the Andes.

Wednesday the 26th of March 2003- Day 36.

Arrived in Rio Gallegos at 8.35am. I was tempted to hitch to Ushuaia because the only bus service goes through Chile, a 12-14 trip while trucks take a more direct southern route. Still beause we arrived an hour late, all the trucks had left and I decided to buy an airline ticket for Ushusia for Monday the 31st of March, and take a few days in El Calafate. I took the bus from the station (either number 1 or 12 will do) to get to the town centre. Very much an industrial town – petro, coal etc, and pretty ugly all round. I walked around a few hours and booked a one way ticket from here to Ushuaia for 95 P (tourist rate). Natives only pay about one third of that price. The tourist rate is official and there is no point in shopping around. Spent a few hours walking around and got breakfast and coffee. Went back to the station and booked the TAQSA bus from Rio to El Calafate for 30 P. This is a five hour trip.

The PARQUE NACIONAL LOS GLACIARES park is the second largest in Argentina, extending some 170 km along the Chilean frontier and covering some 660,000 hectares. Some 40% of the park is covered by giant ice fields, with 47 major glaciers of which 13 flow east descending into the park to feed the two big lakes, Lake Viedma in the north and Lago Argentino in the south. There are also about 190 smaller glaciers that are not connected to the ice fields.

Just east of the ice fields are areas of southern beech forest and further east still the Patagonia steppe with shrub vegetation. There are over a hundred species of birds inhabiting the forest and steppe.

Los Glaciares (Spanish for “the glaciers”) is a national park in the Santa Cruz Province, in the Argentinian part of Patagonia. It comprises an area of about 6000 km2. In 1981 it was accepted as World Heritage by the UNESCO.

The major part of the national park consists of three greater glaciers (Perito Moreno Glacier, Upsala Glacier and Viedma Glacier) and a number of smaller ones. These flow into two lakes, the Lago Argentino and the Lago Viedma, both of which are only partially within the national park.

Los Glaciares is a major attraction for international tourists. Starting point of tours is the village of El Calafate at the Lago Argentino. The Fitzroy Massif in the northern part of the park is frequented by mountaineers and trekking tourists.

Adjoining to Los Glaciares at the Chilean side of the border is the national park Torres del Paine.











Patagonia – Angry Sky over El Calafate

Taken on the 26th of March 2003

Los Glaciares is a major attraction for international tourists. Starting point of tours is the village of El Calafate at the Lago Argentino. The Fitzroy Massif in the northern part of the park is frequented by mountaineers and trekking tourists.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size











Patagonia – Tractor Power

Taken on the 26th of March 2003

Click on the picture to see it in its original size

Arrived at 7.00pm and the hostel buses were waiting at the bus station. The roads are been redone so the journey was bumpy. Stayed athe popular Abenjunge de Glaciers hostel for 18P per ight. Four person dorm. Two Dutch guys and a local. Booked the Moreno Glacier (Alternative Tour) with the hostel for 65P and went to bed early after getting a few sandwich rolls from the supermarket for the trip. The hostel tour was recommended because its bilingual (unusual) and takes in a 1.5 hour hike as well. It also tries to keep away from the tour bus honey pots.

The town itself is Northern Exposure personified. Has about 400 pernament residents but many more seem to work during the summer tourist season (winter is now beginning here),. The town was quiet and there were more dogs than people. The hostel staff were friendly and approachable. There were lockers in the room but no power outlets so I had to give my battery charger to reception. Went to bed early (around 11.00pm) as I was tired.


As you can see from the map, Calafate and Chatlen are within easy distance of each other (Calafate is 319km from Rio Gallegos).

Thursday the 27th of March 2003- Day 37.

Had the staff wake me at 7.30am. (have yet to buy an alarm clock) and the hostel bus duely collected us at 8.00am. 27 places on the bus… 27 people on the tour.. it is popular … so put your name down a day or two before. A bumpy 2 hour journey to the national park. Stopped a few times so that our guide could explain the geology, history, animals, birds of the area. The place was teeming with eagles. It is 80km to the park, 50km paved, the last 30km are within the Los Glaciares National Park. Upon leaving El Calafate we saw Redonda Bay. The guide said the grass is so yellow beacuse it is called Broom Sedge. This is what I have been seeing since Buenos Aires. The area is too dry and too windy. Therefore all you get is small thorny bushes, tough bunch grasses.Once you reach the National Park, the grass gets green and trees appear.You have to pay 20 P (tourist rate) extra to get into the park.

The climate is this region is cool temperate with no marked dry season. The mean average temperature is 7.5 oc averaging in winter at 0.6 oc and summer at 13.4oc. East of the Andes the sharp drop off in preciptation is due to the rain shadow produced by the mountains.

Some valleys here are still occupied by vast lakes with glaciers. The water is glacier melt with a milky turquoise colour. Tis is from the minute poewdered particles which are held in suspension

We stopped many times to look at Condors flying all around the place (dozens of thrm), and buzzards-eagles, kestrels. We also saw deer and foxes.











Patagonia – View of the Glacier and Mountains

Taken on the 27th of March 2003

Click on the picture to see it in its original size

In the Park, declared by the UNESCO as Natural World Heritage Site iand constituted by the lakes Viedma, Argentino and their surroundings, an ice field from which descend the glaciers Moreno, Onelli, Agassiz and Uspala. With a front of 5 Km., the most astonishing is the glacier Perito Moreno that descends to the Argentino lake. In its advance it crosses the Canal de los Témpanos (Channel of the Floes) , obstructs the drainage of the Rico arm and it elevates the level of their waters up to 19 m on the normal height. Approximately every three years, the waters newly contained in the arm Rico can exercise the necessary pressure to break the wall of ice of more than 60 m of height and to spill out in the lake. The ice glacier increases 2m per day but 2m of the oldest frontage of the glacier breaks off and falls into the lake with a massive roar of thunder and splash. Here are some of the pictures I took.











Patagonia – View of the Glacier and Mountains

Taken on the 27th of March 2003

View of the Moreno Glacier and Mountains. A glacier located in the Los Glaciares National Park of Argentina. The area is known as the Austral Andes, in the south west of Santa Cruz Province very close to the border with Chile.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size











Patagonia – View of the Glacier and Mountains

Taken on the 27th of March 2003

View of the Moreno Glacier and Mountains´ This glacier is particularly famous because of its impressive dimensions and its continuous downward movement, which produces accumulation and rupture of huge pieces of ice. It has a front of 5 km with a height above the lake level of 60 to 70 meters. It is about 30 km long and covers a surface area of 250 square kilometers (40 km2 more than the surface of Argentina’s capital city, Buenos Aires!!). It was named after the explorer Francisco Moreno, a pioneer that studied the region in the 19th century.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size











Patagonia – View of the Glacier and Mountains

Taken on the 27th of March 2003

View of the Moreno Glacier and Mountains.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size











Patagonia – View of the Glacier and Mountains

Taken on the 27th of March 2003

View of the Moreno Glacier and Mountains.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size

Saturday the 22nd of March 2003- Day 32 to Monday the 24th of March 2003- Day 34.

Saturday the 22nd of March 2003- Day 32.

Left Buenos Aires at 12.45. Massive Retiro bus station. Got there by metro (0.70p). Very hard to find the right loading bay. There are about 80 bays here stretching over 3/4 of a mile. Thought I missed it, but it arrived late. 20 hour bus jouney in sem-camba bus. Not as nice as the falls to BA bus. Price was 81 P with Eistralla Condor. Stopped 3 times, once for dinner which was included in price. No blankets or whiskey before bed. Was comfortable enough. Very little traffic, and no houses or towns as such. Very few people live in this area. For 1/2 the journey lots of open countryside, blue sky, cattle and horses but the second half was like desert. They showed Wag the Dog with Dustin Hoffman and Robert De Niro. Seeing as the US is at war, which is the plot in the film, in order to cover up domestic difficulties i.e the economy, it was very interesting they referred to the first Gulf War on many occasions during the film. Recommended.

Sunday the 23rd of March 2003- Day 33.

Arrived to Puerto Madryn (pop 50,000) at 10.00am. Tourist Office in the station and walked to my Hotel Vaskonia (20 P) a night. Puerto Madryn is a port on the Golfo Nuevo and was the site of the first Welsh landing in 1865 by 153 Welsh immigrants. Welsh is the primary language of some of the towns around her, especially Trelew.

This city is a part of the coast corridor formed also by the cities of Trelew, Gaiman, Rawson and West San Antonio. The entire region is characterized by the long beaches and its big marine fauna. People come here for the whales, sea elephants and penguins.It is very windy and cold here. Used my jacket for the first time. Its like Yougal on a cold November. Deserted Street, no tourists, and a cold wind from the sea. Very, very different from Buenos Aires. Locals just walked around and window shopped. Found myself doing the same. The city of Puerto Madryn is located on the northeastern side of the province of Chubut, on the shores of the New Gulf and standing at the foot of the cliffs of a plateau reaching 120 metres above sea-level.

The mean annual temperature is 14 degrees Celsius with a maximum temperature for summer of 35 degrees Celsius, and a minimum in winter below 5 degrees Centigrade.

So time on my hands…. Therefore, can afford to update the blog. I will try and redit many of the past posts from the past number of weeks to spell check and add history and flesh out details. I have not been doing this up until now.

Booked my nature tour for tomorrow with Factor Patagonia for 50P. The Penguins can wait until Tuesday and more than likely I will depart Wednesday.Maybe I should have taken a 300P flight from BA to Ushuaia.

Met four people from the bus that I arrived into town with for Dinner. Two Scots and two from Holland. Went to a Parrilla, big steaks, chips, two beers, and a starter of sausages came to 23P (7.20 EURO) including tip. Place was called Estela (Pena 27). Place was full with Welsh posters, memorabilia. Great table service from the waiters. Highly recommended.











Puerto Madryn – Argentina

Taken on the 23rd of March 2003

Puerto Madryn, Province of Chubut, Patagonia, was founded on July 28, 1865, when 150 Welshmen of the ship “The Mimosa” named the natural port “Puerto Madryn” after Loves Jones Parry, who was Madryn Baron in Wales. The settlement grew as a result of the railway track laid between Madryn and Trelew was built by Welsh, Spanish, and Italian immigrants. Puerto Madryn is protected by the Golfo Nuevo, which is formed by Peninsula Valdés and Punta Ninfas.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size











Puerto Madryn – Argentina

Taken on the 23rd of March 2003

This is one bar I wont be visiting here!!!! Anyway a very quiet, bleak down this time of year.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size

Monday the 24th of March 2003- Day 34.

Collected in my hotel (Vaskonia – 25 de Mayo 43) at 8.00am. Only one only guy called Asha – moody untalkative American, on the tour to Península Valdés. Península Valdés in Patagonia is a site of global significance for the conservation of marine mammals. It is home to an important breeding population of the endangered southern right whale as well as important breeding populations of southern elephant seals and southern sea lions. The orcas in this area have developed a unique hunting strategy to adapt to local coastal conditions. In high tide, they beach themselves to grab cubs. Anyway long drive to Park 1 hour, and 2 hours to drive into the park. Saw hares, grey foxes, sea lions, sea lions, elephant seals, ostriches, llamas etc, but unfortunately no Orcas.



The first main spot (see map) was Punta Note where we saw the sea lions. The second main spot was Punta Delagas in the south where we saw the elephant seals. Arrived back in Puerto Madryn at 5.00pm and tired. Some pics below.











Península Valdés – Argentina

Taken on the 24th of March 2003

Península Valdés in Patagonia is a site of global significance for the conservation of marine mammals. It is home to an important breeding population of the endangered southern right whale as well as important breeding populations of southern elephant seals and southern sea lions. The orcas in this area have developed a unique hunting strategy to adapt to local coastal conditions. Its a UNESCO Site.

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Península Valdés – Argentina

Taken on the 24th of March 2003

The first wild penguins I ahve ever seen. Wild!

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Península Valdés – Argentina

Taken on the 24th of March 2003

Click on the picture to see it in its original size











Península Valdés – Argentina

Taken on the 24th of March 2003

Click on the picture to see it in its original size

DATE AND HISTORY OF ESTABLISHMENT

Península Valdés was designated as an Integral Objective Touristic Nature Reserve by Provincial Law No. 2161 of 1983. This reserve includes the following conservation units: Punta Norte and Isla de los Pájaros Touristic Nature Reserves, which were established by Provincial Law 697/67; Golfo San José Marine Park, which was created by Provincial Law 1238/74; Punta Pirámide Touristic Nature Reserve, which was established by Resolution 9 of 1974; and Caleta Valdés and Punta Delgada Touristic Nature Reserves, which were established in 1977. In 1995, an intangible zone extending from Punta Arco to Punta Pardelas in Golfo Nuevo, was created by Provincial Law 4098. In 1985, the southern right whale was declared as Natural Monument by the National Congress. Inscribed as a World Heritage site in 1999.

ALTITUDE From 100m to – 35m at Salinas Grandes, which is the lowest point in mainland South America.

PHYSICAL FEATURES

Península Valdés is a 4,000km2 hilly promontory protruding 100km out into the Atlantic Ocean, with a series of gulfs, rocky cliffs, shallow bays with extensive intertidal mudflats and sandy beaches, and islands. The Ameghino Isthmus of 25km of length connects the Península to the mainland and separates the San José Gulf, to the north from the Nuevo Gulf, to the south. The San José Gulf is a closed bay linked to the San Matías Gulf only by a small passage on its north. The Nuevo Gulf is a bay nearly completely enclosed by the Península itself and the coast of the Chubut province. The shoreline of the Península extends for 400km and represents 34% of the total coast of the Chubut Province. On its eastern end is the Caleta Valdés, a cove 35km in length with some islets on its northern inner point. The Isla de los Pájaros is a small island (18ha) located 800m off the Península in the San Jorge Gulf, and connected to the mainland during the low tides. This island is very important for several species of coastal and marine birds, which form breeding colonies on it. The interior of the Península presents a generally flat relief with shallow lakes, as well as areas of salt pans, such as Salinas Grandes and Salina Chica. There are no permanent rivers or streams in the Península and fresh water is in short supply. Soils are generally very shallow.

CLIMATE

Península Valdés has a semi-arid climare characterised by an annual rainfall of 240mm with significant fluctuations between years. During winter there are from 12 to 20 days of frost. Annual temperature amplitude is 10,6°C (from 15°C to 35°C in summer and from 0°C to 15°C in winter), being February the hottest month.

VEGETATION

While the predominant vegetation is Patagonian desert steppe, 18 different communities can be found, representing a high diversity in such a small area. The number of communities represented in the area demonstrate its importance from the phyto-geographic point of view, considering that in the whole Patagonian region 28 communities have been described. Some 130 plant species from 41 families have been reported, with 38 species endemic to Argentina. Principle communities include tussock grasslands of Stipa spp. and xerophytic cushion grasses of Poa spp. interspersed with bushes of Schinus magellanicus and Condalia microphilia, among other species.

FAUNA

Península Valdés is an outstanding sanctuary of fauna with numerous marine birds and mammals going there to reproduce, often in large numbers. These species find shelter and abundant food in the warm and productive waters of the Península and surroundings, and places to breed and build their nests on its coasts.

A population of southern right whale Eubalaena australis (CD) uses the clear and protected waters of the Nuevo and San José gulfs as mating and calving areas. Individual whales start to arrive in the Península by late autumn and the beginning of winter (from April to June). The results from recent surveys indicate that 1,200 whales were visiting the Península in 1990 (Payne et al., 1990), and suggest that this population has been growing at an estimated annual rate of 7.1%. Should this rate had been maintained, then the current population may count around 2,700 individuals. In 1984, the species was declared as a Natural Monument by the Argentine National Congress.

The southern elephant seal Mirounga leonina forms a mating and calving colony on Punta Norte from late August to early November, reaching peak numbers during the first week in October (Campagna et al., 1993). This is the most northern colony of the species and is the only continental one established on Argentine shores, as all other colonies are located on insular Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic areas. It is also the only one in the world that is said to be on the increase (Campagna and Lewis, 1992). The nominated site is also very important as a breeding point for the southern sea lion Otaria flavescens (Tagliorette and Losano, 1996).

Several other species of marine mammals are found in the area including a stable group of orca Orcinus orca. Orcas are highly predatory with a basic diet of fish and squid, although they have been seen preying on both young and adult sea lions, elephant seals and adult right whales in Península Valdés and elsewhere in Patagonia. These orcas use a particular approch for hunting; they rush into the shallow surf, strand itself on the beach near the prey and grab it in their jaws (Campagna and Lopez, 1997). Other species of small whales and dolphins present are the dusky dolphin Lagenorhynchus obscurus (DD), Peale’s dolphin L. australis (DD), Commerson’s dolphin Cephalorhynchus commersonii (DD) and long-finned pilot whale Globycephala melas.

Terrestrial mammals are abundant with large herds of guanaco Lama guanicoe existing almost everywhere in the Península. Other species present include the mara Dolichotis patagonum, Argentine grey fox Dusicyon griseus, culpeo fox D. culpaeus and Geoffroy’s cat Felis geoffroyi.

Península Valdés has a high diversity of birds. There are 181 species of birds, of which 66 are migratory species. Seven species of marine and coastal birds form nesting colonies on 12 distinct sites scattered throughout the Península. The Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus is the most numerous breeder with almost 40,000 active nests distributed amongst five different colonies (Carribero et al., 1995). Second to the penguin is the kelp gull Larus dominicanus with 6,000 active nests (Bertelotti et al., 1995). Other colonial birds are the Neotropic cormorant Phalacrocorax olivaceus, black-necked cormorant Phalacrocorax magellanicus, great egret Casmerodius albus, black-crowned night-heron Nycticorax nycticorax and common tern Sterna hirundo. The site with the largest diversity of breeding birds is Isla de los Pájaros.

The intertidal mudflats and coastal lagoons are important staging sites for migratory shorebirds, including red knot Calidris canutus, white-rumped sandpiper C. fuscicollis and Hudsonian godwit Limosa haemastica (Blanco and Canevari, 1995).

LOCAL HUMAN POPULATION

There are 220 permanent residents at Península Valdés, half of whom live in the small coastal village of Puerto Pirámide. A total 56 sheep farms holding almost 80,000 heads exist throughout the Península. Wool is the main product.

Up to the middle of this century concessions were granted by the Government for the killing and commerce of sea lions, mainly for the leather and oil of the grease coat. Large-scale exploitation of sea lions took place until 1953, year of the last record. Nevertheless, the killing continued in the zone until 1960, and even on a clandestine way up to the ’70s. Latter legislation for the conservation of the marine mammals prevented further commercial killings.

Throughout the Península, water supply is a problem, with fresh water transported to the various facilities from Puerto Madryn. Recently, a desalinisation plant was installed in Puerto Pirámide with a capacity of 200,000 litres per day. This is estimated to be sufficient to cover the demand of up to 2,000 people, although the level of use varies with temperature and type of accommodation.

VISITORS AND VISITOR FACILITIES

Tourism is a very important activity in Península Valdés and is not limited to any particular season, although the number of visitors peaks during late winter and early spring. In 1992, more than 85,000 tourists visited the site, and in 1997 the number of visitors rose up to nearly 140,000, of which almost 80% were nationals (Tagliorette and Losano, 1996). Whale-watching is the activity, which attract most of the visitors to the Península; between 1993 and 1995, almost 40,000 people or 40% of the total visitation for that period, performed this activity. It has been estimated that whale-watching generates an income of about US$10 million per year (Rivarola et al., 1996). Facilities for visitors exist both in the Península and nearby cities such as Puerto Madryn and Trelew. The town of Puerto Pirámide, located in the southern coast of the Península, is the tourist centre for the off-shore whale-watching. There is also a hotel at Punta Delgada. However, most visitors spend the night in Puerto Madryn. The road network, which connect the Península main attraction points with neighbouring cities is well-developed; an estimated 83% of the visitors travel by car and remain in the area for periods of three days or more (Tagliorette and Losano, 1996). Three visitor centres exist in the Península and they are now undergoing renewal.

CONSERVATION VALUE

Península Valdés has an outstanding value as a sanctuary for wildlife and is of particular importance for some species of conservation concern. It has been estimated that around 50% of the world’s extant population of southern right-whale visit its waters each year. The area is also important for other species of marine mammals and birds, which are decreasing elsewhere, such as the southern elephant seal. All these species attract a large number of visitors and represents a large source of income for the region.

Friday the 21st of March 2003- Day 31

Friday the 21st of March 2003- Day 31.

Went to Colonia. Like a airport, I had to check in at 8.00am for my 9.00 O Clock Ferry. Went through baggage check in, screening, bag screening and immigration control. I took the slower 2 h 30 m ferry for 71 which included a city tour and an english bus. I just wasn’t up to doing it solo, as I was in the Shamrock pub with Rory thee night before and I had a bit of a sore throat. Anyway the ferry left promptly and arrived in Colonia at 110.30. The bus was waiting and took us to a free lunch. You get a good discount if you are just doing a day trip, so had nice ham starter, ravioli lunch and dessert. They then took us the city tour to the bull ring, the old city etc. The Argentinean crisis has hit the town badly. Many of the residents, spenders and tourists were Argentinean but numbers have dropped and many are selling up. The streets were pretty empty and the cars old. But the town was very nice and it is an UNESCO World Heritage site. Some picture are below .











Colina- Uruguay

Taken on the 21st of March 2003

This is one of the old town’s oldest streets. Founded in 1680 by the Portuguese, Colonia was later disputed by the Spanish settled at the other bank of the river, in Buenos Aires. The colony kept changing from crown to crown due to treaties like Treaty of Madrid in 1750 and Treaty of Santo Ildefonso in 1777, until it finally remained with the Spanish. It belonged to the Portuguese again, and later to the Brazilian, after 1816, when the entire eastern bank (Banda Oriental) of the Uruguay was seized by the Rio de Janeiro government.

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Colina- Uruguay

Taken on the 21st of March 2003

Today, the city has expanded to the east, but its original part still keeps the “disarranged”, terrain-fitting street plan in the oldest part, built by the Portuguese, contrasting nicely with the wider orthogonal calles in the Spanish area.

The historical parts of Colonia are held by the UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

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Colina- Uruguay

Taken on the 21st of March 2003

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Colina- Uruguay

Taken on the 21st of March 2003

Taken from the top of the lighthouse.

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Colina- Uruguay

Taken on the 21st of March 2003

The old bull ring built by the Spanish. Fab looking building. Its banned there now.

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The bus collected us at 5.45 (after giving us 2 free hours at the end), and got the 6.45 ferry back to Buenos Aires. The ferry left on time and arrived early to Buenos Aires at 9.30pm. You can actually see BA from Colina. Anyway, because it was my last night in BA and it was a Friday night, myself and Rory went to the Kilkenny. Met some people we met earlier in the week. Funny town, as the place did not get busy until 2.00am. Left at 5.00am as my bus was at 12.45 and I still had to pack.

Day 23 to Day 30 (Monday the 17th of March 2003- Day 27 to 20th)

Monday the 17th of March 2003- Day 27. Saint Patricks Day
For example, Auditorio de Belgrano has a concert

on Saturday night, Centro Borges has a series of concerts. Short ceremony at the Cathedral Monday 17 at 11.30, followed by ditto at Admiral Brown’s monument. Mass Monday evening 19.30 in Holy Cross Church in the south of the city, Estados Unidos y Urquiza, followed by social evening.











Buenos Aires – Saint Patricks Day’ Admiral Brown Monument.

Taken on the 17th of March 2004

Saint Patrick’s Day and as it should, I was suffering from a major hangover. The cermony from from the city cathedral to the Admirals statue. Flanked by the Irish embassey staff and navy top brass, the abnd played loud. Schools kids had the flags. I think i was the old Irish tourist there. i was introduced to the Ambassador and the staff. I fact I went to the pub with one of them later.

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Buenos Aires – Saint Patricks Day’ Admiral Brown Monument.

Taken on the 17th of March 2004

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Admiral William Brown

A naval officer of the Republic of Argentina, b. 1777, in the County Mayo, Ireland; d. 3 May, 1857, in Buenos Aires.

His family emigrating to America in 1786, Brown shipped as a cabin boy on a vessel sailing from Philadelphia. During the war between France and England his ship, an English merchantman, was captured by a French privateer and he was made prisoner of war. He escaped to England, where, in 1809, he married a lady of good family and education. He re-entered the ocean trade with a ship of his own, which was wrecked on the coast of South America. Here he established the first regular packet service between Buenos Aires and Montevideo.

In the revolt of Buenos Aires against Spain the insurgents appointed Brown, February, 1814, to the command of a squadron of seven ships. With these he achieved wonders. On St. Patrick’s Day he captured the fort of Martin Garcia, called “The Gibraltar of the La Plata”, compelling nine Spanish men-of-war under Admiral Romerate to retire. Later, at Montevideo, which capitulated 20 June, he captured several Spanish men-of-war. These he took to Buenos Aires, and received the rank of admiral.

In 1816 Admiral Brown sailed round the Horn to succor the new republics on the western coast, but his expedition was only partly successful. Ten years later, when war ensued between the new republic and Brazil, Admiral Brown greatly distinguished himself against tremendous odds in the blockade of Buenos Aires, which he succeeded in breaking. Taking the offensive he scoured the coast as far as Rio de Janeiro. His most brilliant victory was the battle of Juncal, 24 February, 1827, when, with seven ships and eight one-gun launches, he destroyed a fleet of seventeen war-vessels under Admiral Pereira. He acted as Argentine Commissioner when, at the close of the war, the liberty of Buenos Aires was guaranteed by the treaty of Montevideo 4 October, 1827.

After a visit to his native land, Admiral Brown spent his last years in the republic in the founding of which he had been such a powerful factor. He died in Buenos Aires 3 May, 1867, and in the Recolta cemetery a lofty column marks his resting-place.











Buenos Aires – Saint Patricks Night at the Kilkenny.

Taken on the 17th of March 2004

Jesus, What a night drinking. All day and all night and the next day again. Thepubs were packed with Irisha nd wann-a-be Irish. Lots of green. Free Guinness gear. People buying me drinks. Camera crews asking me questions in Spanish. My response “Ole, ole, Ole” What a night!

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Buenos Aires – Saint Patricks Night at the Kilkenny.

Taken on the 17th of March 2004

Buenos Aires – Saint Patricks Night at the Kilkenny. Ronan from Leitrim in Blue (centre ) and Rory in Green.

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Tuesday the 18th of March 2003- Day 28.
Nothing done today as we only finished up at 7.00am the next morning.Met Ronan and Rory at 8.00pm in the Druids Inn. Drank until 3.00am. Good craic. Met a mad South African, whom we had met on Saint Patricks Night.

Wednesday the 19th of March 2003- Day 29.
Nothing to note hee. Walked down to the docks area. Early night. A bit of a cold. Watched CNN re war preparations. Got a bag of laundry done close to the hotel for 5P.

<Thursday the 20th of March 2003- Day 30.
Booked ferry tickets to Colonia Price was 71 p with return tickets, meal, bus tour and english guide just for me. Colonia was founded in 1680 by Portuguese settlers who valued its proximity to Buenos Aires 50 km. across the Rio de la Plata. They used Colonia as a base for their contraband while trying to undercut the Spanish monopoly on trade. One of the major sights in Colonia is the riverside fortress which was built to protect the Portuguese from the many Spanish attacks over the decades. Spain eventually captured the city in 1762 but in 1777 the Viceroyalty of the River Plate was established allowing goods to proceed directly into Buenos Aires and causing Colonia’s commercial importance to die. Colonia is an extremely friendly town and has a historic neighborhood in its core that consists of narrow cobbled streets and old whitewashed colonial buildings that are situated next to the river.

Anyway also went to the bus station by METRO (station Retiro) and booked a ticket for Pen?nsula Valdés in the South. Ticket was 81 P . Duration of trip is 18 hours. Ticket for 12.45pm for Saturday the 22nd. Arrive the 23rd at 9.50am in the morning. So soon leaving BA, and I will be sorry to do so.

Buenos Aires

Celtic go throught. They won 2-0 tonight (3-1 Aggregate). Notmy picture, obviously. (20-03-2003)

Sunday the 16th of March 2003- Day 26.

Sunday the 16th of March 2003- Day 26.

Went to the San Telmo Market at 10.30am. A bit touristic, like a flea market with bric and brac but many stands selling antiques. Some good tango exhibitions there.











Buenos Aires – Demonstrations on the way to San Telmo Market.

Taken on the 16th of March 2003

Buenos Aires – More Demonstrations.

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Buenos Aires – San Telmo Market

Taken on the 16th of March 2003

Buenos Aires – San Telmo Market. Tango is a social dance form that originated in Buenos Aires and Montevideo. The musical styles that evolved together with the dance are also known as tango. Early tango was the music of the thugs and gangsters who visited the brothels of a city with 100,000 more men than women (in 1914). The complex dances arose as men danced in groups, expressing machismo and sexual desire, leading to the aggressive and competitive mood of the dance form.

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Buenos Aires – San Telmo Market

Taken on the 16th of March 2003

A guy called Guiraldes played a major part of the international popularization of the tango, and wrote a poem which describes Tango music as the “all-absorbing love of a tyrant, jealously guarding his dominion, over women who have surrendered submissively, like obedient beasts”.

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Stayed until 1.00pm. Went to the Millhouse Hostel to find only two people had put their names down for the match. Very disappointed, but another guy also wanted to go, and decided to meet up at 4.00pm to go independently. it should be noted that the two companies in BA, called Gofootball and Tangol charge 100 P for the trips. anyway when I met Nick from London at 4.00pm, he had found two others from his hostel who also wanted to go. Rory from Cabintelly in Dublin and a American whose name escapes me.











Buenos Aires – Buenos Aires – River Plate Stadium

Taken on the 16th of March 2003

Anyway had a great time. Cost us 8p for a taxi, (2 p each), and the most expensive tickets were 20P. Alos 2P each back. So instead of the 70 ‘100P we would have spend, all done for 24P. Had a great time at the match where River were playing La Plata. Alot of security and La Plate fans were penned in, but they were very vocal. The Antonio V. Liberti stadium (known as el Monumental) is located in the Nuñez neighborhood of Buenos Aires. It has room for approximately 57,900 people, and was renovated for the 1978 World Cup (the opening and final matches were both held in the Monumental, which had a capacity of 78,000 at the time because some sections were standing-room).

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Buenos Aires – Buenos Aires – River Plate Stadium

Taken on the 16th of March 2003

Club Atlético River Plate, known also as River Plate or simply River, is a football team of Argentina, founded in 1901. Its home base is the neighborhood of Nuñez, in Buenos Aires, and it plays at the Estadio “Monumental” Antonio V. Liberti. The club’s name is the traditional English name of the river next to Buenos Aires. It is believed that, in the club’s early days, one of the founders saw sailors in the Buenos Aires port unloading boxes, and was intrigued by the markings on them: “The River Plate”.

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River was founded 25 May 1901, close to the La Boca neighborhood (home of rival side Boca Juniors). The team moved to Núñez on the northern side of the city in 1923.

In the early 1930s, the transfer of Bernabé Ferreyra involved much more money than any transfer before it, and the club became known as los millonarios (the millionaires).

In the 1940s, Alfredo Di Stefano and Eduardo Omar Sívori played for River before moving on to became stars in Europe. Some River players had stints in the Colombian league when it was the world’s wealthiest.

River’s attractive, offensive playing style earned it the nickname la máquina (the machine). The names of its five forwards (Muñoz, Moreno, Pedernera, Labruna, Lusteau) are known by heart by most Argentine fans.

Between 1952 and 1957, River won five out of six league titles, and then 18-year drought ensued. River returned to form in 1975 and had a string of championship titles under coach Angel Labruna with players like Daniel Passarella and Norberto Osvaldo Alonso.

In 1986, River won its first Libertadores cup. A new generation of home-grown players led by Claudio Caniggia went on to achieve success both in River and abroad.

River Plate has won 32 Argentine professional championships, as well as the Intercontinental Cup in 1986, the Copa Libertadores twice (1986 and 1996), the Copa Interamericana in 1987, and the Supercopa in 1997.

River has an historic and fierce rivalry with Buenos Aires side Boca Juniors. Each of their matches is called el superclásico (the super-derby).

Its president and manager is José M. Aguilar and its coach is Leonardo Astrada.

Met Rory later in the Kilkenny at 1..00pm. Stayed until 4.00am. Met Ronal from Leitrim when there. Very good night.

Thursday the 13th of March 2003- Day 23 to Saturday the 15th of March 2003- Day 25

Thursday the 13th of March 2003- Day 23.

Burned some pictures onto a CD ‘ ROM. Hope it works.











Buenos Aires – March for the Disappeared

Taken on the 13th of March 2003

Every Thursday at 3.00pm in front of the balcony of the Casa Rosada, relatives of the 3,000 people who disappeared during the dirty war demonstrate. The women wear shawls on their heads with the details of the disappeared person on the back.

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Went to two hostel called Millhouse and Saint Nicholas to see if they were going to organise a tour to a match. Millhouse were for 70P which included a BBBQ, transfer, tickets etc.











Buenos Aires – San Jose Martin Memorial

Taken on the 13th of March 2003

Buenos Aires – San Jose Martin Memorial which is on the main city catherdral. Saw the changing of the guard Later on when to the Shamrock Irish Pub. Met some very nice people from Buenos Aires.

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Friday the 14th of March 2003- Day 24.

Demonstration take place daily.. meaning I see an average of 2 to 3 demonstrations PER DAY. The teachers, railway, subway people are striking. Economic strikes, bank demonstrations.











Buenos Aires – Teachers Demonstration

Taken on the 14th of March 2003

Buenos Aires – San Jose Martin Memorial which is on the main city catherdral. Saw the changing of the guard Later on when to the Shamrock Irish Pub. Met some very nice people from Buenos Aires.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size











Buenos Aires – Teachers Demonstration

Taken on the 14th of March 2003

Buenos Aires – San Jose Martin Memorial which is on the main city catherdral. Saw the changing of the guard Later on when to the Shamrock Irish Pub. Met some very nice people from Buenos Aires.

Click on the picture to see it in its original size

Went to the Kilkenny Irish Pub. This is the first time I have been out in BA as such. Anyway some 7.00 hours later, meeting many people from BA and Ireland, many of whom bought me drinks, got home at 4.00am.

Saturday the 15th of March 2003- Day 25.

Nothing done today because of a vicious hangover. First day off. More to come because of Saint Patricks Day

Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires – Demonstrations in BA againt the War. Not a picture by me. (15-03-2003)